History of the Jambulance

Retiring from the Army as a Lieutenant Colonel in 1998, I returned home to Toledo, Ohio after wandering around the globe for the past 20 years. During all those years I didn’t see a single Toledo Rockets football game, and was only able to attend a couple of basketball games when I happened to be home on leave from the Army.

Slowly, at the urging of my brother-in-law John Kromenacker, I began to attend more and more sporting events. Little did John, a life-long Rockets fan, realize the monster that he had inadvertently created.

I never tailgated, but slowly became aware of the pre-game festivities in Lot 10-the parking lot outside of the Glass Bowl Stadium that is reserved for Rocket Fund donors. Little-by-little I began my transformation into a Rocket Fanatic. It started with a variety of props, signs, and noisemakers that I began to carry into the Glass Bowl. I discovered two internet message boards (www.ncaabbs.com) I hand made a stencil of the athletic logo Rocket that I chalked on to the windows of my van on game day. I added car flags and began to follow the Rockets on the road. As I became more and more of a fan, that simply wasn’t enough. Then on Saturday, September 6th 2003, before the Rocket’s football season home opener against Liberty, I saw the Hoyt Rocket in Lot 10. The wheels in my head began to turn and churn.

My inspiration for the Jambulance came primarily from three sources:

1. The “Hoyt Rocket”. The “Hoyt Rocket” made it’s premier outside the University of Toledo Glass Bowl during the 2003 season. Hand-made by Roger and Bruce Hoyt, father and son, this magnificent rocket was a three-dimensional interpretation of the rocket in the Toledo athletic logo. It was 8-foot-long, trailer-mounted, hoisted in launch-like position, and spewing smoke. It was a thing of beauty to behold. Sadly the rocket fell into disrepair after a couple of seasons and hasn’t been seen for several seasons.

2. The “Kisor Rocket Trailer”. My second inspiration was Chris and Deanna Kisor’s Rocket Trailer. Painted in Midnight Blue and accented with Rocket Gold decals the Rocket Trailer made it’s debute in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday, September 4th, 2004 when Toledo played the University of Minnesota in both team’s season opener. The Kisor Rocket Trailer always attracts a large crowd of Toledo and opposing fans (likely due to the full beer keg operated by a rocket-topped tap).

3. The “Blue Crew”.
Rockets Anonymous

During the summer of 2004 a group of Toledo fans from the message boards started to meet informally on a periodic basis to discuss Rockets sports. We called ourselves “Rockets Anonymous”. I enjoyed the camaraderie and opportunity to began to ponder Jambulance Features.

The Origin of the Jambulance

As far as we have been able to figure out the Jambulance began its distinguished career as an ambulance in Cincinnatus, a small town in Cortland County in the state of New York. In the 2000 census the population of Cincinnatus was 1,051. According to Wikipedia the town is named after an important Roman general, Cincinnatus and is the birthplace of Elmer Ambrose Sperry, one of the inventors of the gyrocompass.

We assume that the ambulance was eventually retired from service and then exchanged hands. In March, 2005 I found it for sale on a used ambulance site on the Internet. Looking for a “unique” tailgating platform the former owner (an Army Major stationed in Miami, Florida and headed to a year-long tour in Kuwait) and I came to terms regarding the sale of the vehicle via e-mail and telephone. I purchased the Jambulance pretty much sight unseen except for a couple of photos posted on the Internet along with the Major’s assurance that it was in good shape. At that time the ambulance was located in Atlantic City, NJ and was being looked after by a friend of the owner.

In early April 2005, in a giant leap of faith, Photodan and I boarded a plane bound from Detroit to Atlantic City, NJ to go pick up the ambulance. The owner’s friend met us at the Atlantic City airport that morning with the ambulance. After getting about a 10-minute orientation, in a steady rain, on the operation of the vehicle Photodan and I hopped into the ambulance and headed west for the 600+ mile trip back home to Toledo. The first piece of Rockets memorabilia, a mini helmet air freshener was hung from the rear view mirror where it remains to this day. We arrived home in Toledo later that evening and the ambulance soon began its transformation into the Jambulance.

Jambulance Transformation

The Jambulance transformation started with the a few notable changes to the exterior. The white body of the Jambulance is the original base color and it has remained intact. During the Spring and Summer of 2005 the red accent stripe was repainted Rocket Gold by Steve Grabke’s Body Shop in Holland, Ohio. Once Grabke’s was done with paint, the Jambulance moved on the Dyno Dave’s Graphix’s to have vinyl decals applied that were designed by Photodan. These include two 16-foot long, eye-popping rockets on both sides of the vehicle as well as other decals that clearly delineate the vehicle as the Toledo Rockets “Jambulance”.

To complete the initial transformation all of the emergency lenses were changed from red to a combination of yellow and blue (Toledo’s colors are Midnight Blue and Rocket Gold). In addition, a full-size grill, a 27’ LCD flatscreen TV, TracVision (mobile DirecTV), and a nice Kenwood stereo system were installed. These enhancements, as well as many, many hours of elbow grease shining diamond plate and other general exterior cleaning, completed the initial transformation of the vehicle into the Jambulance -- just in time for the 2005 football season.

Jambulance Features

The Jambulance is a 1993 Ford E-350 7.3L diesel ambulance prep package chassis with an E-One Type-III ambulance body. In hindsight selecting an ambulance as our tailgating platform was a great idea. The ambulance box itself is all aluminum so rust isn’t an issue. All of the original emergency equipment (lights, sirens, public address system, etc.) remain fully operational.

The beauty in the Jambulance setup is that we simply back up into a parking space, swing open the rear doors, crank up the stereo, swivel the flatscreen 180 degrees to watch the game on DIRECTV, fire up the Freedom Grill and, in a matter of minutes, we are tailgating in style. Not to mention that the Jambulance has plenty of external storage cabinets where we have a Toledo gazebo tent, Toledo chairs, folding tables, and a run-quiet generator. I doubt there are many other tailgating vehicles out there that can match the speed and efficiency of the Jambulance Crew when it comes to set up and tear down.

Since acquiring the former ambulance in April 2005 the following enhancements and features have been installed:

2005

TracVision A5 (www.kvh.com/tracvision) – Added in 2005 the KVH TracVision system lets the Jambulance hit the road with up to 185 channels of live DIRECTV sports, news and movies.

Flat-Screen LCD TV – Added in 2005, the original 27” LCD flat-screen TV was replaced by a 32” LCD flat-screen with built-in DVD player prior to the 2006 season (bigger is better, unfortunately we can’t go any bigger or else we can’t spin the TV 180 degrees to view it out the back when we are parked).

Freedom Grill FG-100 (www.freedomgrill.com) – Added in 2005 the Freedom Grill FG-100 is a full-size grill that is mounted on the 2” hitch receiver on the rear of the Jambulance. The grill’s patented arm locks in place for driving and swings away for cooking and access. The stainless steel grill stays outside the vehicle at all times meaning no cooking odors and leaving room for more passengers in the back of the Jambulance (eliminating passenger odor is an entirely different matter altogether).

Honda Super Quiet EU2000i Generator – Added in 2005, this great little generator provides 2000 watts (16.7 A) of 120V AC power, is super quiet, lightweight, and can run up to 15 hours on one gallon of fuel. The principal use of this generator is to provide power to crock pots, tent lighting, our kerosene heater’s fan when it gets cold, and whatever else requires AC power once we arrive at our final tailgating location.

Kenwood Stereo System – Added in 2005, the Jambulance’s onboard stereo system is comprised of four Kenwood 6” x 9” speakers mounted in the rear doors, a 14” Kenwood subwoofer mounted below the Mission Control panel, and two Kenwood 2000 watt amplifiers installed in a cabinet with our DC-to-AC power converter.

3000 Watt DC to AC Power Converter – Added in 2005 the DC-to-AC power converter provides on-board power for all of the various gadgets and widgets inside the Jambulance that require 120V AC power. The converter is robust enough to power all of the widgets, and even handle a crock pot to keep things warm as we head to our destination.

2006

Custom Toledo Rockets Grill Grate by Yarder Manufacturing (www.ymigrate.com) - Added in 2006, the Jambulance sports a custom Toledo Rockets grill rack that was custom made to fit the Freedom Grill. Made right here in Toledo by family-owned Yarder Manufacturing, this unique grill features heavy duty stainless steel construction and a highly polished finish. A great product, Yarder can manufacture their custom grill grates to fit any grill (round, rectangular).

Jambulance Helmet – Added in 2006 one of the distinguishing features of the Jambulance is the oversized Toledo Rockets football helmet that resides on top of the front cab. The helmet was originally a “helmet grill” that Steve fabricated and modified to mount on the top of the cab. The original helmet was stolen off of the Jambulance at Iowa State in 2006 and had to be replaced. The “new” helmet features two blue LED “eyes”, and may one day feature a “helmet cam”, or even spit fire...

Custom LED lighting – This project was started in 2006 and continues. This is another contribution by Steve whose goal is to eliminate as much of the traditional and halogen incandescent Jambulance lighting as possible by replacing it with LED-based lighting. LEDs are highly efficient and bright, eliminating both heat and power consumption. LED lighting is featured throughout the Jambulance including custom UT “wig wag” lights, blue and yellow LEDs on the front grill, and a number of cool interior LCD applications.

2007

Whelen Messenger (http://www.whelen.com) – Added in 2007 the Whelen Smart Arrow Messenger is normally used to communicate roadway hazard information the displays text and symbolic information on a high-intensity LED display. Mounted on the top rear of the Jambulance the messenger allows messages to be displayed in a variety of fixed and moving formats, such as flashing and scrolling with normal, boldface, reverse, and mirrored text. Along with several pre-programmed messages such as “GO ROCKETS”, “WE ARE UT”, and “CAUTION JAMBULANCE AHEAD” we’ve since added the ability to insert messages on the fly via the on-board computer in the Jambulance. The message content possibilities are virtually endless as you might well imagine.

Mission Control Panel – Designed by Steve, the Mission Control panel was conceived prior to the 2007 football season. The on-board Xycom computer is mounted in the panel as is a two-receptacle 120V AC power outlet and RCA jacks to allow an X-Box, PlayStation, or GameCube video game console to be easily connected. These jacks directly interface with the 32” LCD Flat-Screen TV. The Mission Control panel also features a countdown clock (final installation and testing is pending) that will eventually allow us to countdown the time remaining (down to tenths of a second) until the next game’s kickoff.

On-board Computer – Purchased on eBay prior to the 2007 season this next-to-new Xycom brand (http://www.profaceamerica.com) industrial touchscreen computer is designed to withstand the rugged requirements of high temperature, shock and vibration environments typically found on an industrial automation floor (or those encountered on the road in the Jambulance). Featuring a 12.1” touchscreen and enhanced with the addition of a larger hard drive this Xycom PC stores the Jambulance’s ever-growing iTunes library, GPS software, Whelen Messenger programming software, and other computer-related functions. In 2008 a second computer will be installed and networked with the Xycom to provide additional CPU horsepower, video capabilities, and USB connectivity.

Custom Stainless Steel Panels – Added in 2007 all of the Plexiglas cabinet doors for the interior storage cabinets were replaced with custom stainless steel doors with the Rockets logo lasered in them. These panels were custom fabricated by Yarder Manufacturing, the same company that made our custom grill grate.

Jam Cam – Added in 2007 the Jambulance features a color CCTV camera mounted on the rear of the vehicle. This camera can be displayed on any of the 5 monitors installed in the Jambulance and is used to assist the Jambulance driver in backing up and parking (and also to check out who is in the vehicle behind us as we roll down the highway). A second camera is being considered for installation in the helmet on the top of the front cab, i.e., the “Helmet Cam”, so that the passengers in the back of the Jambulance can see where we are headed via one of the displays.

2008

Front Cab Upgrade - As part of the 2008 season upgrades the entire front cabin of the Jambulance was stripped bare to replace the original carpet and to repair a couple of rust spots in the floor panels (“Rust Never Sleeps”). In addition to a new custom console, new midnight blue carpet was installed and the original seats were replaced with two black racing seats to finally give the front cab a fresh look.

Custom Console – Added in 2008 a new fiberglass console was fabricated as part of the front cab upgrade. The console features a 12.1” MobileVu touchscreen display, Kenwood’s KDC-BT838U advanced in-dash CD receiver with USB direct control and bluetooth technology, and a pair of 5¼”, 2-way, 160-watt Kenwood KFC-1382ie speakers. The console allows the crew in the front cab the capability of controlling everything (PC, video, and audio) as we navigate down the road. The touchscreen display is hinged to open up and allow easy access to the old mechanical controls for emergency lights, siren, PA system, and engine idle. These controls have been neatly tucked away on their own internal shelf. Eventually, Steve hopes to control all mechanical switches (lights, siren, etc.) via controller software and only use the mechanical switches as a backup.

Rear Compartment Upgrade – As part of the 2008 season upgrades the seats in the in the back of the Jambulance are slated to be reupholstered prior to the start of the 2008 football season. As part of the rear compartment upgrades, a racing seat that matches the front cab seats was also installed to replace the old swivel seat. In addition the original floor was painted smoke grey to also give it a fresh look.

Litton MobileVu Touchscreens (http://www.l-3com.com/rcc/products/mobilevu/display.html) – Added in 2008, the Jambulance has two MobileVu touchscreen displays. One is a 12.1” display installed in the front console, and a second 10.4” display mounted on one of the rear gurney doors. These MobileVu displays are a truly sunlight-readable color display designed specifically for mobile use in law enforcement, fire, safety, utility, military and medical vehicles The MobileVu display is rugged, easy to view in direct sunlight, and dimmable to near black for night use. MobileVu is built to withstand the rigors of mobile environments and to deliver critical data when needed and includes composite video input for in-car video viewing. When new these displays cost in the range of $3000+ each. The Jambulance touchscreen displays are connected to the two on-board computers that allow the Crew the ability to control different audio and video feeds. The display on the rear door was installed specifically to select music from our iTunes play list without having to go inside the vehicle.

Wireless Broadband Internet Access – Added in 2008, the Jambulance is truly connected to the Internet at all times via Sprint’s U727 EVDO USB Modem. With Sprint’s mobile wireless broadband internet access we can stay in touch with other fans, family, and friends via email, message boards, and blog sites as we travel down the road. Global Positioning System (GPS) – Added in 2008, the Jambulance features the small, highly accurate Garmin 18 GPS. The Garmin 18 is a 12 parallel channel, WAAS-enabled sensor with a windshield-mounted antenna that is less than three inches in diameter. The Garmin 18 includes nRoute and City Navigator DVDs that allow the Jambulance Crew to look up addresses and services and get voice-prompted, turn-by-turn directions to our final tailgating destination — displayed right on our touchscreen displays. No more “where are we”?

USB TV Tuner – Added in 2008 the Hauppauge WinTV HVR-950 brings the Jambulance over-the-air high definition ATSC digital TV plus analog cable TV to your PC or laptop. By plugging the device it into one of the USB 2.0 ports and connecting it to a TV antenna, the WinTV allows the crew the ability watch and even record high definition digital TV at up to 1080i.

HornTones (www.horntones.com) – Added in 2008 the Horntones FX-550 system is the first mobile audio system that allows you to supplement your vehicle’s horn function using virtually any MP3 audio file. Using the latest electronic device and communications technology, Horntones Audio products provide you with a unique capability to personalize your automobile experience with an unlimited variety of sound clips and sound effects.

2005-2008

Paint, Polish and Elbow Grease – Maintaining the Jambulance is an ongoing project. The Jambulance is a 15-year old vehicle and it doesn’t stay looking good all by itself. Keeping it in pristine condition is a year-long effort that usually begins in the spring when the weather starts to get warmer here in Toledo. Right now the Jambulance sits in my driveway all year long and Toledo gets its share of cold and inclement weather. The first warm weather usually finds the Crew coming out of hibernation to begin preparations for the next football season. Even after three years there are still nooks and crannies that I’m cleaning. The stainless steel and aluminum diamond plate gets a good polishing every year, along with a fresh coat of wax.

The Jambulance is a very visible unofficial, ambassador on wheels for the University of Toledo and we always ensure that we “represent” in a positive manner. It is always great to give fans from other schools a tour of the Jambulance (we’ve done that hundreds of times now) and to hear their positive comments. In 2007 outside of the University of Kansas (Jayhawks) Memorial Stadium one particular older gentlemen, who had lived in the adjoining neighborhood for many years, told me it was the best tailgating vehicle he had ever seen roll into town. That is why we do what we do.

Meet the Jambulance Crew

The Jambulance Crew is a small, dedicated group of die-hard Toledo Rockets fans who have supported the cause from the very beginning. They are:

Pat “Ranger Rocket” Ryan – Owner/Operator

The Jambulance – Insanity or Genius??? Perhaps a little of both…

I am a 1978 graduate of the University of Toledo. A three-year Army ROTC scholarship winner, George C. Marshall ROTC Leadership Award recipient, and Distinguished Military Graduate I received a Regular Army commission in the Signal Corps in June 1978.

For the next twenty years I served in a variety of military units including the 82nd Airborne Division (Fort Bragg, North Carolina), 8th Infantry Division (Mechanized) (Mainz, Germany), Special Operations Command, Pacific (Camp H. M. Smith, Hawaii), 7th Infantry Division (Light) (Fort Ord, California), and the United States Special Operations Command (MacDill AFB, Florida). I am a Master Parachutist, Jumpmaster, and Army Ranger.

Retiring from the Army as a Lieutenant Colonel in 1998 I returned home to Toledo, Ohio. During all those years in the Army I didn’t see a single Toledo Rockets football game, and was only able to attend a couple of basketball games when I happened to be home on leave at the right time.

It took me a few years to become the Rocket Fanatic I am today. Slowly, at the urging of my brother-in-law, John, I began to attend more and more Rockets sporting events. Little did John, a life-long Rockets fan, realize the genie that he had inadvertently let out of the bottle.

I never tailgated, but slowly became aware of the pre-game festivities in Lot 10 -- the parking lot outside of the Glass Bowl Stadium that is reserved for Rocket Fund donors. Little-by-little I began my transformation into a Rocket Fanatic. It started with a variety of props, signs, and noisemakers that I began to carry into our stadium, the Glass Bowl.

I hand-made a stencil of the rocket athletic logo that I applied with liquid chalk to the windows of my van on game day. I added Toledo car flags and began to follow the Rockets at home and on the road. I discovered two internet message boards (www.ncaabbs.com and www.toledorockets.com) devoted to the Rockets. These sites eventually allowed me to meet many devoted Rockets fans online, and then many of them in person. The camaraderie that I had enjoyed in the Army with my fellow soldiers began to reappear in the form of a small, die-hard group of Rockets fans. However, as I became more and more of a fan my props and noisemakers simply weren’t enough. I wanted to display my Rockets pride in a unique manner.

On Saturday, September 6th 2003, before the Rocket’s football season home opener against Liberty, I saw the brand new Hoyt Rocket in Lot 10 (see below). The wheels in my head began to turn and churn. A year later, in 2004, I met Chris Kisor and he showed me his Rockets tailgating trailer. Between the Hoyt Rocket and the Kisor trailer I was determined to make my on mark on the Toledo Rockets tailgating scene. A year later, on Thursday, September 1st, 2005 the Jambulance made its first appearance in Lot 10 prior to the Rocket’s football season opener against Western Illinois. The rest, as they say, is history.

My inspiration for the Jambulance came primarily from three sources:

1. The “Hoyt Rocket”. The “Hoyt Rocket” made its premier outside the University of Toledo Glass Bowl during the 2003 season. Hand-made by Roger and Bruce Hoyt, father and son, this magnificent rocket was a three-dimensional interpretation of the rocket in the Toledo athletic logo. It was approximately 15-foot long, mounted on a trailer, hoisted in a launch-like position, and spewing smoke. It was a thing of beauty to behold. Sadly the rocket fell into disrepair after a couple of seasons from being stored outside in harsh weather and hasn’t been seen in Lot 10 for several seasons. A couple of years ago I considered buying this rocket from the Hoyt’s, repairing it, and then pulling behind the Jambulance. That thought still remains a remote possibility in the back of my mind.

2. The “Kisor Rocket Trailer”. My second inspiration was Chris and Deanna Kisor’s Rocket Trailer. Painted in Midnight Blue and accented with Rocket Gold decals. The Rocket Trailer made its début in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday, September 4th, 2004 when Toledo played the University of Minnesota in the season opener for both teams that year. The Kisor Rocket Trailer always attracts a large crowd of both Toledo and opposing fans (likely due to the full beer keg Chris keeps on-hand, served from a rocket-topped tap). Wherever the Rocket Trailer is parked the Jambulance can always be found close by (and usually side-by-side).

3. The “Blue Crew”. My third inspiration was the UT Blue Crew whose collective spirit and devotion to the University of Toledo is highly infectious. The Blue Crew is a secret society of spirited UT students who represent the pride inside of every Rocket. This crazy 10-member organization is fully dedicated to instituting, reviving, and maintaining the University of Toledo's traditions. Each Blue Crew member is hidden under an assumed identity and name. The members are only revealed at the end of the season of their graduating year or after they have faithfully served in the position for four full semesters. The Blue Crew travels to all home and away football games as well as both men and women's basketball games dressed in blue and yellow “Afro” wigs, gold masks, painters overalls (decorated individually by each member), and Converse All-Stars shoes. The Jambulance often serves as home base for the Blue Crew in Lot 10, when we travel on the road, and they march along side the Jambulance in the homecoming parade each October.

Born: MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, Florida
Music: Classic Rock
Favorite Quote: "Rust Never Sleeps"
Day Job: Project Manager
Miscellaneous: My daughter Kellie will be a freshman at UT starting Fall, 2008

Contact Pat at [email protected]

Steve “Don’t Mess With” Tecza – Mechanic/Electrical/Electronics/Operator

Steve is the mechanical and electronics genius behind the Jambulance and I owe an enormous debt of gratitude to him for his tireless devotion to the cause. Steve has devoted countless hours to make the Jambulance what it is today. No matter what kind of crazy ideas we come up with Steve manages to make them happen (well… maybe except for that darn thermostat). Steve is a man of action and very few words and that’s why his bio is so short.

From: Oberlin, Ohio
Education: Firelands High School, degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering from UT
Likes: Extreme Recycling, Three-phase Plans, Unconventional Occupations.
Music: The White Stripes, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Beck, OAR, Hank Jr., Johnny Cash, Led Zepplin, Aerosmith, and more.
Favorite Quote: "The day I can't do my job drunk is the day I turn in my badge and gun."
Motto: “The difference between insanity and genius is measured only by success”
Day Job: Absolute Engineering Co.
Miscellaneous: Is Single, Likes Women (that statement would be true for the entire Jambulance Crew at this point in time, we’re all single and we all like women).

Contact Steve at [email protected]

Dan “Photodan” Miller – Graphics/Photography/Crewmember

Dan is the visual genius behind the Jambulance. Dan was able to visually transform an ordinary ambulance into a tailgating icon by keeping the graphics clean and simple. While the Jambulance can certainly light up a parking lot with all of its lights, bells, and whistles at night, Dan’s graphics are immediately eye-catching in the light of day. In fact, we often wonder how many State Trooper’s don’t realize, until it is too late, that the ambulance blazing past them isn’t… or that time at Iowa State where we almost ended up inside the walls of the stadium with the Jambulance…

Dan has lived in or around Toledo for most of his life. He is a 1999 graduate of UT with a bachelor's degree in art and is currently the University Photographer for main campus (and his photography is world class I might add).

Dan and I became friends in September of 2004 during the rehabilitation of the Nike-Ajax missile that sits outside the Glass Bowl. Dan has been with the Jambulance project from the inception, and once talked me out of (thank you very much Dan) purchasing an old Jacuzzi-outfitted fire truck before I decided to purchase the Jambulance instead.

After the decommissioned E-One ambulance was located, Dan flew out to Atlantic City with me to take ownership of the vehicle (including a quick side trip to buy a couple cases of Yuengling in Pennsylvania), before bringing her home to Toledo.

Dan’s most notable contribution was the design of the external vinyl graphics package and the ability to eat unbelievable amounts of meat off the Freedom Grill during tailgate parties.

Contact Dan at [email protected]

Scott “Busdriver” Frey – Mechanic/Operator

Scott introduced me to Steve and that’s the only real reason he’s even remotely considered a crewmember (just kidding). Scott professes to have wrestled an alligator into submission, gone over Niagara Falls in a barrel, and to hold complete and total domination over the opposition in the competitive sport of cornhole. I’m sure only the latter is actually true since I’m usually Scott’s cornhole partner (that doesn’t sound very good actually) and we rarely lose (usually when Scott has tipped a few too many). We do claim title to being the World Cornhole Champions (again, that doesn’t sound very good).

Scott is an easy going person who is into college sports and other outdoor activities. His wild imagination has led to many great moments in UT tailgating history such as the creation of the infamous backup siren (beep, beep, beep…), homecoming pig roast, WMU helmet heist, etc. Scott is a true Rockets fan in every sense of the word. In reality Scott has earned the esteemed title of Jambulance Crewmember with his untiring expenditure of elbow grease working on the Jambulance, as well as his ability to find the cheapest exhaust system in Toledo (with chrome tip no less).

From: Born sometime in 1983 near a cornfield in Van Wert, Ohio
Education: Lincolnview High School 2001 Alumnus (Van Wert, Ohio), BA 2006, MBA 2007 UT Alumnus,
Miscellaneous: UT Blue Crew Alumnus
Day Job: The Anderson's Grain and Ethanol Division

Contact Scott at [email protected]

Abe “UT1” Fadell - Copilot/Crewmember

One of Toledo’s most dedicated fans Abe has supported the Jambulance from day one. After all, only one individual can possess the “UT1” license plate and that’s Abe. Abe can usually found in the copilot’s seat as the Jambulance makes its way down the road. However, his map reading skills are suspect and that’s why we installed the GPS.

Abe comes from a family of seven children (6 boys and one girl) and graduated from Whitmer High School here in Toledo. Abe has a Bachelors degree in Accounting and an MBA degree from the University of Toledo, is a life member of the UT Alumni Association, a Rocket Fund member, a Lady Rocket Fan Club member, a Downtown Coaches Association member, and has a brick in the Varsity T Sports Pavilion. Abe is a season ticket holder in football and men's and ladies basketball. Did I mention that he was a dedicated Rockets fan?

Abe’s first job was as a Toledo Blade paper carrier. He financed 100% of his UT education by working as a part time Produce Clerk for Churchill's Super Markets.  He has over twenty-five years experience in various accounting positions for Toledo area firms and is presently employed at Midwest Tape, LLC located in Holland, OH.

A charter member of the Jambulance Crew, Abe’s involvement with the Jambulance over the years has primarily been as a navigator on numerous football and basketball trips, both short and long distance. As a devout crewmember, Abe selflessly helps set up the Jambulance for tailgating, both home and away, and helps tear down after tailgating activities have concluded.

Contact Abe at [email protected]@utjambulance.com

Mike “Big Mike” Raines – Muscle/Crewmember

We don’t call him “Big Mike” without reason. His past is largely unknown except for those with a need to know. More cowbell….

Contact Mike: When you figure that out let us know

Jambulance-related Websites

Top

Road Signs
University of Toledo Jambulance
University of Toledo Jambulance
Slow Men Playing
cone
Speed Limit 80
Curvy Road